Understanding why so many minorities have a problem with the police

According to a detailed analysis of Bureau of Justice Statistics and local police department data by the New York Timeseven after decades of effort to recruit more minorities into policing, some big-city and suburban departments have wide racial imbalances between the race of police officers and residents. Nationally, African-Americans made up 12 percent of local police forces inaccording to a recent report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Hispanics are also underrepresented by about 5.

Understanding why so many minorities have a problem with the police

Toggle display of website navigation Voice: Why is the United States such a global outlier? January 5,8: In Cleveland, that was enough to deprive him of the benefit of the doubt, and his life. Police killings of African-Americans — mostly young, mostly male, and many unarmed — have sparked local, national, and global protests, court cases, and some overdue national soul-searching.

If bad cops are the problem, the rest of us can go to bed with clear consciences and no need to look in the mirror. A closer look at the data suggests that America does not, in fact, have a problem with racist police violence — instead, it has several quite distinct problems with racism, policing, and violence.

Or, to put it a bit differently, America has a violence problem, and a racism problem, and a policing problem. Too often, all three problems intersect, with results inscribed in blood. The whole world knows that America has a violence problem.

Understanding why so many minorities have a problem with the police

Some studies suggest that between 35 and 50 percent of all civilian-owned guns in the world are in the United States. In Britain, there are only 6. In the United States, there are somewhere between 88 and guns per people. The per capita U. In the United States, police officers often assume the opposite, and given the astounding number of guns around, they may be right to do so.

American police are far too quick to use lethal force — and so are most of the rest of us. But America also has a racism problem. The poisonous legacy of slavery and segregation is still with us. Centuries of overt discrimination have left African-Americans still struggling to overcome enormous race-based disparities in educational attainment, employment, health, and economic well-being.

Compared to whites, black Americans are more likely to be convicted if arrested for a crime and more likely to receive a harsh sentence than white Americans convicted of the same offenses.

Overall, black men have a one-in-three chance of landing in prison at some point in their lives, while white men have only a one-in chance. Some of it is overt — racial slurs flung at black students at the University of Missourifor instance — while some comes from what researchers call implicit bias: Tamir Rice is a particularly tragic case in point, but a report published by the U.

Department of Education notes that as early as pre-school, black children are punished in school more often and more severely than their white classmates. A note on methodology here: All else being equal, black Americans are more likely to be arrested, convicted, and given prison sentences than whites, and black Americans are also some three times more likely than white Americans to become homicide victims or victims of other violent crimes.

According to a report from the national Bureau of Justice Statistics, Americans living in poverty were more than twice as likely to be the victims of violent crimes as Americans living in high-income households. Did I mention that America has a poverty problemtoo? Rates of violent victimization were similar for poor blacks and poor whites, but in America, black families are three times more likely than white families to live in poverty.

Here again, all this raises a question about police killings of African-Americans.

Understanding why so many minorities have a problem with the police

Does the disproportionate number of police killings of African-Americans reflect a police racism problem? America has a police problem, too.

The United States has a patchwork of law enforcement agencies, including some 18, separate state and local police departments and 73 federal law enforcement agencies. Meanwhile, more than different law enforcement academies offer training to would-be law enforcement professionals.

While some academies are operated by municipalities and only admit new hires, other academies will admit any student willing to pay. The content of police training also varies greatly. Some academies train officers extensively in how to de-escalate tense situations and handle mentally ill citizens; others do not.

Instead, it has more thansworn state and local officers andfederal law enforcement officers, but these officers operate within hundreds of different police cultures; enforce different municipal, state, and federal criminal codes; and have dramatically varying levels and types of training.

Wyoming now leads the nation in per capita police killings, for instance; inpolice in Wyoming killed six people out of a population of just ,Many law enforcement agencies have allowed researchers to study efforts to improve the lawfulness and legitimacy of their policing activities.

They do so because they want to raise the level of trust and confidence of the people they serve while controlling crime effectively. Understanding Why so Many Minorities Have a Problem with the Police PAGES 1. the police, problem with the police, police officers. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin.

Daly City is a municipality in northern California and is located in San Mateo County. Daly City's population of , is 24 percent white, 4 percent African American, 56 percent Asian American, less than 1 percent Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, and less than 1 percent Native American.

Police - Police and minorities: The relationships between police and ethnic and racial minorities present some of the more enduring and complex problems in policing throughout the world. Such relationships can be harmonious, but they often are problematic. A closer look at the data suggests that America does not, in fact, have a problem with racist police violence — instead, it has several quite distinct problems with racism, policing, and violence.

Or, to put it a bit differently, America has a violence problem, and a racism problem, and a policing problem. Many police officers have interpreted public support for body cameras as public censure of the police. 66 However, Americans who have a favorable opinion of the police are as likely as those with.

Why it's difficult for minorities to become cops