Reasons for parents to spy on

Do the parents also know that they have their own set of limitations too? Did they think about the possible consequences of their action?

Reasons for parents to spy on

The app takes over a smartphone screen, locking the phone from further use and sounds an alarm that only stops when the recipient replies by text. Parents can tell when the child has seen a message or if the phone is turned off.

The app is available to download and costs from 99p to send messages to one person. It sounds like an invasion of privacy and the latest attempt by overbearing, distrustful parents to track and control their teenage progeny.

Spying on Your Child: When the Game Changes

But this is fair enough — it serves the little sods right for not replying. However, mobiles have also long been employed as key ammo in the teen arsenal in the ongoing war against parental interference in their otherwise sensational social lives. Thus, texts and calls are ignored, with the teen pretending to have missed them or blatantly ignoring them.

Parents not only have a right, they also need to know that their children are safe. That last sort of app in particular sounds like it goes too far but something such as ReplyASAP seems reasonable — how else is a parent supposed to respond to being casually or deliberately phone-blanked?

Then there are those parents who contribute to the problem — making beleaguered troubleshooting parents feel like control freaks and failures.Should parents spy on their children's emails and texts?

We have discussed the reasons why she must never write anything she wouldn’t say to a person’s face, and she is happy – for now. It’s a question up for debate, since modern parents not only have to deal with outside human distractions (like friends, schoolwork, and after school activities) but today’s parents also have to deal with a different kind of world: the online world.

The new digital spy tools present parents with a quandary. Adolescence is a critical time in kids’ lives, when they need privacy and a sense of individual space to develop their own identities.

Reasons for parents to spy on

It can be almost unbearable for parents to watch their children pull away. The new digital spy tools present parents with a quandary. Adolescence is a critical time in kids’ lives, when they need privacy and a sense of individual space to develop their own identities.

It can be almost unbearable for parents to watch their children pull away. “If you have to spy on your kids, something’s wrong,” says Michael Brody, a child psychiatrist and head of the media committee for the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

In Plain Sight

The whole business of overzealously monitoring kids is ridiculous and completely infantilizes your child. Parents not only have a right, they also need to know that their children are safe. It’s this need, not the right, that I believe morally overrides the child’s entitlement to privacy.

It’s this need, not the right, that I believe morally overrides the child’s entitlement to privacy.

Is it ever OK for parents to cyber-spy on their kids?