Pictorialism in the victorian era

Using Greek mythology as inspiration, and contemporary photographic techniques, I hope to produce a series of portraits that are true to the ideal of Pictorialism. I also want to briefly examine the way these female photographers portray their female subjects.

Pictorialism in the victorian era

Using Greek mythology as inspiration, and contemporary photographic techniques, I hope to produce a series of portraits that are true to the ideal of Pictorialism. I also want to briefly examine the way these female photographers portray their female subjects.

Chapter 1 — Pictorialism Pictorialism was in vogue from around and Sorry, but full essay samples are available only for registered users Choose a Membership Plan declined after with the emergence of Modernism.

Pictorialists strove to make photographs as much like paintings as possible. Portraits were often linked to biblical, classical or literary subjects. The emotional impact of an image was more important than what was in front of the camera. The aim was to demonstrate that photography was the equal of traditional painting, rather than just a technical skill that anybody could master.

Pictorialism in the victorian era

The technology available in the 19th Century necessitated slow exposure times and the use of studio settings. Subjects were posed to achieve the ideal composition. Most of these pictures were black and white or sepia toned. Examples of this approach include; combination printing, the use of soft focus, special filters and lens coatings and manipulation of negatives.

The use of gum dichromate lessened detail and produced a more artistic image. Rough surface printing papers also reduced sharpness.

Pictorialism in the victorian era

The debate whether photography is art continues unresolved today. Photographers such as Ansel Adams still strive to produce unique artworks that are indistinguishable from paintings. Chapter 2 — Julia Margaret Cameron Cameron started photography in the early s and experimented for about ten years, producing extraordinary portraits of Victorian England.

Her photographs were mainly two types; those of famous Victorians such as Lord Tennyson and Charles Darwin and recreations of literary and historical events.

She was influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite School, and her explicit goal was to secure the status of high art for photography. Her female portraits are of women as symbols of timelessness and ideal beauty.

These images convey a range of emotion and experiences rarely openly expressed during the Victorian era; and are arguably her strongest works. Her softly lit women with unpinned hair, are full of sensuality, longing, sadness and beauty. Their powerful emotions fill the dark shadows and diffused backgrounds of their portraits.

Her soft-focus technique gave her images a dream-like quality, often using dramatic and symbolic lighting. Cameron had no desire to produce sharply focussed descriptions of her models. She wanted to create photographs with the subtle qualities of light and shadow that she admired in the high drama of Old Master paintings, rather than a depiction of fact.

It differed from earlier techniques, such as the Daguerreotype and the Calotype, by reducing exposure time, and producing a sharp negative from which multiple prints could be made. Chapter 3 — Madame Yevonde Yevonde established her studio in With a strong sense of the theatrical, her style evolved from traditional portraits, to highly stylised and slightly surreal images in the s; when she famously used The Vivex Colour Process to photograph society ladies in roles from classical mythology.

She experimented with lighting systems, backgrounds and papers. She also began using a variety of props to balance her compositions. Vivex was a subtractive process using three glass quarter-plates for the cyan, magenta and yellow separations; which were processed individually and then brought together at the printing stage to produce a colour image.Pictorialism in the Victorian Era; The Works of Julia Margaret Cameron and Madame Yevonde A Personal Research Project Looking at .

Victorian Era The Victorian era was one of good and bad where empires fell and rose as senseless wars were fought, people dominated, and advancements of culture and technology were made throughout. The Victorian era is called the Victorian era because England was currently being ruled over by .

Pictorialism is the name given to an international style and aesthetic movement that dominated photography during the later 19th and early 20th centuries. There is no standard definition of the term, but in general it refers to a style in which the photographer has somehow manipulated what would otherwise be a straightforward photograph as a.

Pictorialism in the Victorian Era; The Works of Julia Margaret Cameron and Madame Yevonde A Personal Research Project Looking at Two Female Photographers of the .

“As an army of weekend “snapshooters” invaded the photographic realm, a small but persistent group of photographers staked their medium’s claim to .

Pictorialism is the name given to an international style and aesthetic movement that dominated photography during the later 19th and early 20th centuries. There is no standard definition of the term, but in general it refers to a style in which the photographer has somehow manipulated what would otherwise be a straightforward photograph as a.

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